Myth

It doesn’t matter where the U.S. gets its oil from because all oil exporters are the same.

Fact

Former Obama national security advisor and retired general Jim Jones has emphasized the stability of the Canadian-American relationship saying, “Every day it becomes more evident for our nation to achieve true energy security…”

Myth vs. Fact: All Oil Exporters are the Same

Myth

Shutting in Canadian oil sands will have no effect on those unstable regimes that seek to harm the United States’ national security interests.

Fact

The Council on Foreign Relations has concluded that production from Canada’s oil sands could weaken such states by displacing their production and driving down prices.

Myth vs. Fact: Canadian Oil Sands will Have no Effect on US’s National Security Interests

Myth

Importing oil sands from Canada will weaken America’s national security.

Fact

National security experts, including high ranking members of the Obama administration, have stated that national security will be strengthened by deepening the U.S.-Canadian energy relationship.

Myth vs. Fact: Importing Oil Sands from Canada will Weaken American’s National Security

Myth

We have plenty of crude oil supply and our refineries are operating below capacity.

Fact

According to a 2011 Congressional Research Service report, Venezuelan and Mexican crude oil production is declining and refiners will need additional feedstock to refine and supply the U.S. market.

Myth vs. Fact: Plenty of Crude Oil Supply, Refineries are at Below Capacity

STUDY: Diluted Bitumen-Derived Crude Oil: Relative Pipeline Impacts (Battelle)

This report evaluated the claim made that dilbit is more corrosive than other crudes. This evaluation was benchmarked against conventional and/or sour crude, and was based on the existing literature on crude and dilbit properties and characteristics, data on pipeline integrity and results of engineering assays of pipe that has been transporting dilbit, with such [...]

FACT SHEET: The Facts on Oil Sands (CAPP)

CAPP is the voice of Canada’s upstream oil and natural gas industry – representing companies that produce more than 90% of Canada’s oil and gas. Our research indicates that Canadians want a balanced discussion about energy, the economy and the environment. This pocket book is designed to give you fast, easy access to oil sands [...]

REPORT: Environmental and Health Impacts of Canada’s Oil Sands Industry (The Royal Society of Canada Expert Panel)

INTRODUCTION  The oil sands deposits in northern Alberta have become a focus of intense development in recent years. Indeed, bitumen and synthetic crude oil production from the oil sands has in the past decade reached levels that are substantial on an international scale. Oil sands production has become increasingly controversial because of several widely publicized [...]

REPORT: Keystone XL Assessment (EnSys/DOE)

In June 2010, EnSys Energy was contracted by the Department of Energy Office of Policy & International Affairs to conduct an evaluation of the impacts on U.S. and global refining, trade and oil markets of the Keystone XL project to bring additional Canadian crudes, including oil sands, into the U.S. The study was conducted in [...]

REPORT: Special Review of the Keystone XL Pipeline Permit Process (U.S. State Dept)

On September 19, 2008, TransCanada submitted a Presidential permit application to the Department of State (Department) for the Keystone XL oil pipeline. Keystone XL is a proposed 1,700-mile pipeline connecting Alberta, Canada, to the U.S. Gulf Coast. The Department is responsible for reviewing such applications for cross-border oil pipelines by virtue of the Presidential delegation [...]

STUDY: Economic Impacts of Staged Development of Oil Sands Projects in Alberta (CERI)

The worldwide economic recession that hit in 2008 affected the Canadian oil sands significantly. But close to three years later the industry is once again expanding, with a number of major projects under development and still more proposed for the future. Pipelines, or other transportation means such as increased rail haulage, will soon be required [...]